New York: 10 Films Illustrating the City

There are plenty of films out there showcasing the wonderful city of New York (NY, US). Martin Scorsese, especially, is famed for his “New York tetralogy”: first, he portrayed New York as a vision of urban decay (the 1970s) in “Taxi Driver” (1976); then he set love torn by societal conventions in the 19th century New York in The Age of Innocence(1993); then he depicted the city’s violent past in “Gangs of New York” (2002); and he finished his directional tetralogy with New York’s extravaganza (the 1980s) in “The Wolf of Wall Street” (2013). What follow are some other movies (in no particular order) showcasing the corners of one of the most exciting cities on Earth. P.S. Nothing ground-breaking, just the movies we all hopefully love.         

Home Alone Poster

I. Home Alone II: Lost in New York (1992)

Obviously, Chris Columbus’s entertainment-feast “Home Alone II” leads my list as it provides a great itinerary for a first-time visit to New York. In the story, Kevin (Macaulay Culkin) gets separated from his family at the airport and arrives all alone in New York, and what follows is his exciting adventure as he tries to escape two criminals already on his track. Thrashed by critics, but much loved by audiences worldwide, the film is a good home movie showcasing many of New York’s delights. Kevin enters Manhattan via the Queensboro Bridge, and proceeds to tour the city by visiting Battery Park (viewing the Statue of Liberty from it) and apparently the Fulton Fish Market, where two bandits are hiding. Kevin then settles himself comfortably into the Plaza Hotel at the Grand Army Plaza. Other interesting featured locations are the Bethesda Fountain and the Wollman Rink, Central Park; Times Square and Carnegie Hall. That mother-son reunion at the Rockefeller Centre, decorated with the giant Christmas Tree, is that emotional moment we have all been waiting for. 

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Darren Aronofsky is at it again…

Mother-Poster-Rosemarys_1200_1789_81_s-537x800   download

After making his “Black Swan” (2010) out of Satoshi Kon’s “Perfect Blue” (1997) (see my article on the topic here), Darren Aronofsky now seems to make his new film “Mother!” out of everyone’s much beloved horror classic “Rosemary’s Baby” (1968). The phrases “paying homage” and “drawing inspiration” really camouflage the lack of artistic ideas and originality, and it is a pity. More than a pity. If Aronofsky’s shameful “Perfect Blue/Black Swan” creation showed a deplorable disregard for another form of art, his now seemingly hybrid “Rosemary’s Baby/Mother!” monster confirms that there is really nothing sacred left when it comes to making new films in the 21st century.  And, even if Aronofsky’s new film “Mother!” will contain virtually nothing in common/ no similarities with Polanski’s “Rosemary’s Baby“, the new poster to his film “Mother!” is really a step too far, and, surely, demonstrates the lack of basic artistic respect for the previous work of art. How hard is it really to make one’s own movie poster and restrain oneself from dragging the fans of Polanski’s masterpiece into your own money-making machine? 

“Rosemary’s Baby” Review

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

Adapted from a novel by Ira Levin and directed by Roman Polanski, ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ is a psychological horror movie which can now be regarded as a cult classic of the horror genre. The centre of the story is a young couple – Guy and Rosemary Woodhouse (John Cassavetes and Mia Farrow). After the couple’s move to Bramford, a gothic complex of apartment buildings in New York, strange occurrences begin to take place, and their elderly neighbours’ friendliness becomes too suspicious. When Rosemary gets pregnant, suspicions about people around her start to escalate, and the final question becomes: what is the truth here, and what is just a figment of her imagination?

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