Tag Archives: Berlin International Film Festival

“Museo” Mini-Review

Museo FilmMuseo (Museum) (2018) 

This heist movie is by Mexican director Alonso Ruizpalacios (Güeros (2014)), starring Gael Garcia Bernal (No (2012), The Motorcycle Diaries (2004)) and Leonardo Ortizgris (Güeros). Loosely based on a real story, the film won the Silver Bear for Best Screenplay at the Berlin International Film Festival 2018, and is about two young men in their thirties who still live with their families, while trying to become veterinarians. They decide to break their cycle of personal desperation by robbing the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. What follows is their journey trying to convert their stolen Mayan artefacts into money, while battling personal doubts, since they did not initially realise what their theft might mean culturally and societally for the people of Mexico. Museo is a well-made film with an interesting premise and an unusual dimension to it, but it is also fair to say that it often slides into some obvious melodrama, losing its force and conviction. Continue reading “Museo” Mini-Review

“Unsane” Review

Unsane PosterUnsane (2018) 

This psychological thriller by Steven Soderbergh (“Side Effects” (2013)) has the distinction of being the first theatrical feature film shot almost entirely on iPhone cameras, and the result is impressive. Claire Foy (“Breathe” (2017)) plays Sawyer Valentini, a career-driven young woman who has just started a new job in a new city. We are invited to question her sense of reality when she becomes obsessed with the apparent stalking behaviour which is going on around her with her being the primary victim. When Sawyer is invited to spend a few days in a mental institution to rest and gather her wits, her apparent paranoia and delusions intensify. Soderbergh employs iPhone cameras very cleverly to both critique the provision of mental health help and to show Sawyer’s mounting psychological problems.

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The 1961 Blogathon: La Notte

La Notte PosterMovie Movie Blog Blog hosts a blogathon that celebrates movies originating in 1961, and Michelangelo Antonioni’s “La Notte” is one of those movies I decided to write about. Like Antonioni “L’Eclisse“, which followed a year after, “La Notte” concerns itself with the existential theme of personal alienation in the world which becomes busier and more progressing. In such a place, finding right answers to contradictory feelings are often hard, and the apparent artificiality of modern living and its construction is even more obvious as one experiences too human feelings of futility and claustrophobia. “La Notte” may not be the most packed-with-action or fast-paced film there is, but it still represents a one of a kind achievement by its director to lay out some very complex philosophical ideas so clearly on screen. 

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“Indignation” Review

indignation-posterIndignation (2016)

 “Indignation” is a directional debut of a screen-writer and producer James Schamus, known for adapting the script of “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (2000) and being the producer of “Brokeback Mountain” (2005). Adapting the book by Philip Roth, in “Indignation”, Schamus presents the life of Marcus Messner (Logan Lerman), a bright lad who, while working as a butcher in his father’s store in New Jersey, receives a prestigious scholarship to attend a college in Ohio. What follows is the depiction of Marcus’s troubles of fitting into his new college environment as he simultaneously tries to deal with his socially-unacceptable abhorrence for organised religion and with the confusion of his sexual-awakening. Schamus’s film is a particular kind of a film which is heart-breaking in individual scenes and bitter-sweet in its overall presentation, and the director manages to convey the story masterfully, paying particular attention to the character presentation and dialogue.

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“A Royal Affair” Review

Royal_Affair_Quad_FINAL_High Res-1

A Royal Affair (2012)

Nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Foreign Language Film category, this critically acclaimed Danish/Swedish film has so far been unable to pass unnoticed in any country. The engrossing story of a young Princess, Caroline Mathilda (Alicia Vikander) travelling from England to Denmark to marry his majesty Christian VII (Mikkel Boe Folsgaard) is bound to appeal just on the basis of its simplicity, a sense of adventure and romanticism. Although from her childhood years the young Princess often dreamt of her magical encounter with the Prince, in the end everything turns out far from what she had expected. With the King perceived as ‘weak in the head’ and completely childish, Caroline soon becomes infatuated with his right-hand man, a mysterious and liberal-thinking German physician, Johann Friedrich Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen). Together, at the times of repression and injustice, the pair is about to change Denmark beyond all recognition and direct it onto the path of justice and the Enlightenment.

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