The Animation Tag

I got an idea for this post through winst0lfportal and his animation tag post. Borrowing some questions from it, I created my own tag. I love animations, and am a supporter and promoter of international animations (see my previous posts on Russian, French, Chinese and Japanese animations).

  1. Favourite Disney animation?

Beauty and the Beast (1991).

2. Favourite non-Disney animation?

It is tempting to say “Spirited Away” (2001), but I have a soft spot for Howl’s Moving Castle (2004) and would like to make one day an in-depth comparison between it and “Beauty and the Beast” (1991) (a fun one since both are based on other source materials). I also love the works of Satoshi Kon and Makoto Shinkai.

3. Criminally-underseen animation you recommend to everyone?

The Illusionist (2010) is a lovely, heart-warming animation from Sylvain Chomet (“Les triplettes de Belleville” (2003)). In “The Illusionist”, a French illusionist finds himself unemployed and travels to Scotland. There, he meets a young girl and their destinies collide.

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Late Afternoon: Oscar-nominated Short Animation

Late Afternoon” by Louise Bagnall is this year’s Academy Awards nominee in the category of “Best Short Animation”. I somehow prefer it over other nominees, and the frontrunners for the award are considered to be Pixar-produced animation “Bao” and Pixar-related short “Weekends“. Other nominees are touching “One Small Step” and the hilarious and witty “Animal Behaviour“. Normally I enjoy intricate, detailed animations, but, in the case of “Late Afternoon“, I somehow appreciate the simplicity and like how the animation incorporates the concept of memory. Have you watched this year’s nominees yet? Do you have a favourite?

“Up” (2009) vs. “Above Then Beyond” (2006): Simple Coincidence, Unmentioned Inspiration or Stolen Idea?

Up PosterAbove then Beyond Poster

I will first introduce the two animations, then detail the similarities, and, finally, will argue that the French short animation “Above Then Beyond” (2006) and Pixar/Disney produced-animation “Up” (2009) share so many similarities, including shots which are almost identical, that one must have influenced greatly the other, and this is not a question of pure coincidence. Even given the timelines in which the two animations were produced, there is strong case to be made for the French short influencing Disney/Pixar’s final product. Going further, it also seems that, rather than being a mere inspiration, all evidence point to Pixar/Disney covertly using the main idea present in “Above Then Beyond” to fledge out the very essence of their Academy Award-winning film.